Amantadine

Title: Amantadine
CAS Registry Number: 768-94-5
CAS Name: Tricyclo[3.3.1.13,7]decan-1-amine
Additional Names: 1-adamantanamine; 1-aminoadamantane; 1-aminodiamantane (obsolete); 1-aminotricyclo[3.3.1.13,7]decane
Molecular Formula: C10H17N
Molecular Weight: 151.25
Percent Composition: C 79.41%, H 11.33%, N 9.26%
Literature References: NMDA-receptor antagonist; also active vs influenza A virus. Prepn: H. Stetter et al., Ber. 93, 226 (1960); W. Haaf, ibid. 97, 3234 (1964); P. Kovacic, P. D. Roskos, Tetrahedron Lett. 1968, 5833. Antiviral activity: W. L. Davies et al., Science 144, 862 (1964). GC determn in biological samples and pharmacodynamics: W. E. Bleidner et al., J. Pharmacol. Exp. Ther. 150, 484 (1965). Pharmacology and toxicology: V. G. Vernier et al., Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 15, 642 (1969). Comprehensive description: J. Kirschbaum, Anal. Profiles Drug Subs. 12, 1-36 (1983). Review of use vs influenza A: R. L. Tominack, F. G. Hayden, Infect. Dis. Clin. North Am. 1, 459-478 (1987); of pharmacokinetics: F. Y. Aoki, D. S. Sitar, Clin. Pharmacokinet. 14, 35-51 (1988). Review of NMDA receptor binding and neuroprotective properties: J. Kornhuber et al., J. Neural Transm. 43, Suppl., 91-104 (1994). Series of articles on clinical experience in Parkinson's disease: ibid. 46, Suppl., 399-421 (1995).
Properties: Crystals by sublimation, mp 160-190° (closed tube) (Stetter). Also reported as mp 180-192° (Haaf). pKa: 10.1. Sparingly sol in water.
Melting point: mp 160-190° (closed tube) (Stetter); mp 180-192° (Haaf)
pKa: pKa: 10.1
Derivative Type: Hydrochloride
CAS Registry Number: 665-66-7
Manufacturers' Codes: EXP-105-1; NSC-83653
Trademarks: Adekin (Desitin); Lysovir (Alliance); Mantadan (Boehringer, Ing.); Mantadine (Endo); Mantadix (BMS); Symmetrel (Endo); Virofral (Novo)
Molecular Formula: C10H17N.HCl
Molecular Weight: 187.71
Percent Composition: C 63.99%, H 9.67%, N 7.46%, Cl 18.89%
Properties: Crystals from abs ethanol + anhydr ether, mp >360° (dec). Freely sol in water (at least 1:20); sol in alcohol, chloroform. Practically insol in ether. LD50 orally in mice, rats: 700, 1275 mg/kg (Vernier).
Melting point: mp >360° (dec)
Toxicity data: LD50 orally in mice, rats: 700, 1275 mg/kg (Vernier)
Derivative Type: Sulfate
CAS Registry Number: 31377-23-8
Trademarks: PK-Merz (Merz)
Molecular Formula: C10H17N.½H2SO4
Molecular Weight: 200.29
Percent Composition: C 59.97%, H 9.06%, N 6.99%, S 8.00%, O 15.98%
Therap-Cat: Antiviral; antiparkinsonian.
Keywords: Antidyskinetic; Antiparkinsonian; Antiviral.
Amantanium Bromide Amaranth (Dye) Amaranth (Plant) Amarogentin Amarolide

Amantadine
Amantadine stereo.png
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Systematic (IUPAC) name
adamantan-1-amine
Clinical data
Trade names Symmetrel
AHFS/Drugs.com monograph
MedlinePlus a682064
Pregnancy cat. B3 (AU) C (US)
Legal status Prescription Only (S4) (AU) -only (CA) POM (UK) -only (US)
Routes oral
Pharmacokinetic data
Bioavailability 86-90%[1]
Protein binding 67%[1]
Metabolism Minimal (mostly to acetyl metabolites)[1]
Half-life 10-31 hours[1]
Excretion Urine[1]
Identifiers
CAS number 768-94-5 YesY
ATC code N04BB01
PubChem CID 2130
DrugBank DB00915
ChemSpider 2045 YesY
UNII BF4C9Z1J53 YesY
KEGG D07441 YesY
ChEBI CHEBI:2618 YesY
ChEMBL CHEMBL660 YesY
Synonyms 1-Adamantylamine
Chemical data
Formula C10H17N 
Mol. mass 151.249 g/mol
 YesY (what is this?)  (verify)

Amantadine (trade name Symmetrel, by Endo Pharmaceuticals) is a drug that has U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval for use both as an antiviral and an antiparkinsonian drug. It is the organic compound 1-adamantylamine or 1-aminoadamantane, meaning it consists of an adamantane backbone that has an amino group substituted at one of the four methyne positions. Rimantadine is a closely related derivative of adamantane with similar biological properties.

Apart from medical uses, this compound is useful as a building block, allowing the insertion of an adamantyl group.

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 100% of seasonal H3N2 and 2009 pandemic flu samples tested have shown resistance to adamantanes, and amantadine is no longer recommended for treatment of influenza in the United States. Additionally, its effectiveness as an antiparkinsonian drug is undetermined, with a 2003 Cochrane Review concluding that there was insufficient evidence in support or against its efficacy and safety.[2]