Bifidus Factor

Title: Bifidus Factor
CAS Registry Number: 9007-03-8
Additional Names: Lactobacillus bifidus factor; Lactobacillus bifidus growth factor
Literature References: A factor found in human milk and causing a predominant occurrence of L. bifidus in the intestinal tract of breast-fed infants: Petuely, Kristen, Oesterr. Z. Kinderheilkd. Kinderfuersorge 6, 173 (1951); Petuely, Naturwissenschaften 40, 349 (1953). Essential growth factor for L. bifidus var Penn: György in Ciba Found. Symp., Chemistry and Biology of Mucopolysaccharides (Little, Brown, Boston, 1958) pp 140-156. Isoln from human milk: György et al., Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 48, 193, 202, 209, 214 (1954); György et al., US 2786051 (1957 to Am. Home Prod.); from L. bifidus cultured together with Escherichia coli: Kludas, US 2962424 (1960 to J. Carl Pflüger). Isoln from carrots and identification of the major and minor bifidus factor: Samejima et al., Chem. Pharm. Bull. 19, 166, 178, 186 (1971); Z. Tamura et al., Proc. Jpn. Acad. 48, 138, 144 (1972). Prepn from porcine gastric mucosa and use as dietetic adjuvant in infant food: FR 2101032 C.A. 78, 28221g (1970); P. C. Wirth, DE 2040268 C.A. 78, 41859r (1970) (both 1972 to Sogeras).
Use: As adjuvant in powdered milk formulas for infants.
Bifluranol Bifonazole BIGCHAP Biguanide Bikhaconitine

A Bifidus factor (bifidogenic factor) is a compound that specifically enhances the growth of bifidobacteria in either a product or in the intestines of humans and/or animals. Several products have been marketed as bifidogenic factors, such as several prebiotics and methyl-N-acetyl D-glucosamine in human milk.[1][2][3]

The term is mainly used as a marketing and advertising term.