Capsicum

Title: Capsicum
Additional Names: Cayenne Pepper
Literature References: The dried ripe fruit of Capsicum frutescens L., Solanaceae, known commercially as African Chillies, or of Capsicum annuum L., var. conoides Irish, known as Tabasco Pepper or of Capsicum annuum var. longum Sendt, known as Louisiana Long Pepper, or of a hybrid between the Honka variety of Japanese Capsicum and the Old Louisiana Sport Capsicum known as Louisiana Sport Pepper (Fam. Solanaceae). Constit. Fixed oils; 0.1-1% capsaicin, capsanthin, q.q.v. Store in a cool place. Protect from light.
Therap-Cat-Vet: Has been used externally as a counterirritant; internally as a carminative and stomachic.
Captafol Captodiamine Capuride Caraway Carazolol

Capsicum
Fruit and longitudinal section (Bell pepper)
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Asterids
Order: Solanales
Family: Solanaceae
Subfamily: Solanoideae
Tribe: Capsiceae
Genus: Capsicum
L.[1]
Species

See text[2]

Capsicum is a genus of flowering plants in the nightshade family Solanaceae. Its species are native to the Americas, where they have been cultivated for thousands of years. In modern times, it is cultivated worldwide, and has become a key element in many regional cuisines. In addition to use as spices and food vegetables, capsicum has also found use in medicines.

The fruit of Capsicum plants have a variety of names depending on place and type. The piquant (spicy) variety are commonly called chili peppers, or simply "chilies". The large mild form is called red pepper, green pepper or bell pepper in North America and typically just "capsicum" in New Zealand,[3] Australia, and India. The fruit is called paprika in some other countries (although paprika can also refer to the powdered spice made from various capsicum fruit).

The generic name is derived from the Greek word κάπτω (kapto), meaning "to bite" or "to swallow."[4] The name "pepper" came into use because of their similar flavour to the condiment black pepper, Piper nigrum, although there is no botanical relationship with this plant, or with Sichuan pepper. The original Mexican term, chilli (now chile in Mexico) came from the Nahuatl word chilli or xilli, referring to a larger Capsicum variety cultivated at least since 3000 BC, as evidenced by remains found in pottery from Puebla and Oaxaca.[5]