Carbosulfan

Title: Carbosulfan
CAS Registry Number: 55285-14-8
CAS Name: [(Dibutylamino)thio]methylcarbamic acid 2,3-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-7-benzofuranyl ester
Manufacturers' Codes: FMC-35001
Trademarks: Marshal (FMC); Posse (FMC)
Molecular Formula: C20H32N2O3S
Molecular Weight: 380.54
Percent Composition: C 63.12%, H 8.48%, N 7.36%, O 12.61%, S 8.43%
Literature References: Carbamate cholinesterase inhibitor which is hydrolyzed to carbofuran in soil. Prepn: A. L. Black, T. R. Fukuto, BE 817517; eidem, US 4006231 (1975, 1977 both to Regents Univ. Calif.). Metabolism in orange tree leaves and fruit: V. E. Clay, T. R. Fukuto, Arch. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 13, 53 (1984). Degradation and persistence in soil: A. Sahoo et al., Bull. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 50, 29 (1993). HPLC determn in oranges: M.W. Brooks, A. Barros, Analyst 120, 2479 (1995). Spectrophotometric determn in formulations and water samples: K. R. Mohan et al., Asian J. Chem. 10, 457 (1998). Review of physical properties and field trials: E. G. Maitlen, N. A. Sladen, Proc. Br. Crop Prot. Conf. - Pests Dis. 1979, 557-564.
Properties: Viscous, brown liquid. Soly in water at 25°: 0.3 ppm. Soly in organic solvents: > 50%. Vapor pressure: 0.31 ´ 10-6 mmHg. LD50 in male, female rats (mg/kg): 250, 185 orally; in male, female rabbits (mg/kg): >2000, >2000 dermally; in pheasant, mallard, quail (ppm): 26.2, 8.1, 81.6 orally. LC50 (96 hr) in bluegill, trout (ppb): 14.9, 42.4 (Maitlen).
Toxicity data: LD50 in male, female rats (mg/kg): 250, 185 orally; in male, female rabbits (mg/kg): >2000, >2000 dermally; in pheasant, mallard, quail (ppm): 26.2, 8.1, 81.6 orally. LC50 (96 hr) in bluegill, trout (ppb): 14.9, 42.4 (Maitlen).
Use: Insecticide.
Carboxin Carboxymethylcellulose Sodium Carboxypolymethylene Carbromal Carbubarb

Carbosulfan
Carbosulfan.svg
Identifiers
PubChem 41384
ChemSpider 37764 YesY
ChEBI CHEBI:38476 YesY
Jmol-3D images Image 1
Properties
Molecular formula C20H32N2O3S
Molar mass 380.54 g mol−1
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Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
Infobox references

Carbosulfan is an organic compound adherent to the carbamate class. At normal conditions, it is brown viscose liquid. It is not very stable; it decomposes slowly at room temperature. Its solubility in water is low but it is miscible with xylene, hexane, chloroform, dichloromethane, methanol and acetone. Carbosulfan is used as an insecticide.[1] The European Union banned use of carbosulfan in 2007.[2]

Its oral LD50 for rats is 90 to 250 mg/kg bw, inhalation LC50 is 0.61 mg/L. Carbosulfan is only slightly absorbed through skin (LD50 >2000 mg/kg for rabbits). The mechanism of toxicity is based on reversible inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (as for carbamates generally).[3] Carbosulfan has very low maximum residue limits for use in the EU and UK examples of this can be seen in apples and oranges, where it is 0.05 mg/kg.