Diethylaniline

Title: Diethylaniline
CAS Registry Number: 91-66-7
CAS Name: N,N-Diethylbenzenamine
Molecular Formula: C10H15N
Molecular Weight: 149.23
Percent Composition: C 80.48%, H 10.13%, N 9.39%
Literature References: Prepd by ethylation of aniline: Whitman, US 2501556 (1950 to du Pont); Voltz, J. Org. Chem. 22, 48 (1957); Closson et al., ibid. 22, 646 (1957); Horyna, Cerny, Collect. Czech. Chem. Commun. 21, 906 (1956); from bromobenzene, sodium amide + diethylamine: Bunnett, Brotherton, J. Org. Chem. 22, 832 (1957).
Properties: Colorless to yellow liq. d425 0.9302. bp 215-216°; bp3 62-66°. mp -38°. nD24 1.5394. Volatile with steam. uv max (isooctane): 303, 259 nm (e ´ 10-3 2.37, 16.7). Slightly sol in alcohol, chloroform, ether. One gram dissolves in 70 ml water at 12°.
Melting point: mp -38°
Boiling point: bp 215-216°; bp3 62-66°
Index of refraction: nD24 1.5394
Absorption maximum: uv max (isooctane): 303, 259 nm (e ´ 10-3 2.37, 16.7)
Density: d425 0.9302
Use: As dyestuff intermediate, in organic syntheses.
Diethylbromoacetamide Diethylcarbamazine Diethylene Glycol Diethylene Glycol Monolaurate Diethylmagnesium

Diethylaniline
N,N-Diethylaniline.svg
Identifiers
CAS number 91-66-7 YesY
PubChem 7061
ChemSpider 6794
Jmol-3D images Image 1
Properties
Molecular formula C10H15N
Molar mass 149.23 g mol−1
Appearance Colorless to yellowish liquid[2]
Odor Aniline-like[2]
Density 0.93 g/mL[2]
Melting point −38 °C; −36 °F; 235 K ([2])
Boiling point 216 °C; 421 °F; 489 K ([2])
Solubility in water 0.13 g/L[2]
Hazards
Flash point 83 °C (181 °F)[2]
Autoignition temperature 330 °C (626 °F)[2]
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
Infobox references

Diethylaniline is a chemical compound with the molecular formula C10H15N. It is used as an intermediate in the manufacture of dyes, pharmaceuticals and other chemicals, and also as a reaction catalyst. In organic synthesis, the complex diethylaniline·borane (DEANB) is used as a reducing agent.[3]

Diethylaniline may be genotoxic because it has been found to increase the rate of sister chromatid exchange.[4]