Drosera

Title: Drosera
Additional Names: Common sundew; round-leafed sundew; youthwort
Literature References: Air-dried, flowering plant, Drosera rotundifolia L., frequently mixed with closely allied species D. anglica Hudson and D. longifolia L., Droseraceae. Habit. Europe, Asia, North America, south to Florida. Constit. Malic and citric acids, resin, tannin.
Drosophilin A Drotaverine Drotebanol Droxicam Droxidopa

Drosera
Drosera tokaiensis
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Core eudicots
Order: Caryophyllales
Family: Droseraceae
Genus: Drosera
L.
Species

See separate list.

Drosera, commonly known as the sundews, comprise one of the largest genera of carnivorous plants, with at least 194 species.[1] These members of the family Droseraceae lure, capture, and digest insects using stalked mucilaginous glands covering their leaf surfaces. The insects are used to supplement the poor mineral nutrition of the soil in which they grow. Various species, which vary greatly in size and form, can be found growing natively on every continent except Antarctica.[2]

Both the botanical name (from the Greek δρόσος: drosos = "dew, dewdrops") and the English common name (sundew, derived from Latin ros solis, meaning "dew of the sun") refer to the glistening drops of mucilage at the tip of each tentacle that resemble drops of morning dew.