Fensulfothion

Title: Fensulfothion
CAS Registry Number: 115-90-2
CAS Name: Phosphorothioic acid O,O-diethyl O-[4-(methylsulfinyl)phenyl] ester
Additional Names: O,O-diethyl O-[p-(methylsulfinyl)phenyl] phosphorothioate; DMSP
Manufacturers' Codes: Bay 25141
Trademarks: Dasanit (Bayer); Terracur P (Bayer)
Molecular Formula: C11H17O4PS2
Molecular Weight: 308.35
Percent Composition: C 42.85%, H 5.56%, O 20.75%, P 10.05%, S 20.80%
Literature References: Organophosphate cholinesterase inhibitor. Prepn: Homeyer, Schrader, BE 666012 (1965 to Bayer), C.A. 64, 20555f (1966). Acute toxicity and anticholinesterase activity: K. P. DuBois, F. Kinoshita, Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 6, 78 (1964).
Properties: Liquid. bp0.01 138-141°. LD50 in male, female rats (mg/kg): 5.5, 1.5 i.p.; 10.5, 2.2 orally; 30.0, 3.5 dermally; in male, female mice (mg/kg): 10.5, 7.0 i.p.; in male guinea pigs (mg/kg): 5.4 i.p., 9.0 orally (DuBois, Kinoshita).
Boiling point: bp0.01 138-141°
Toxicity data: LD50 in male, female rats (mg/kg): 5.5, 1.5 i.p.; 10.5, 2.2 orally; 30.0, 3.5 dermally; in male, female mice (mg/kg): 10.5, 7.0 i.p.; in male guinea pigs (mg/kg): 5.4 i.p., 9.0 orally (DuBois, Kinoshita)
CAUTION: Potential symptoms of overexposure are skin irritation; nausea, vomiting, abdominal cramps, diarrhea, salivation; headache, giddiness, vertigo, weakness; rhinorrhea, chest tightness; blurred vision, miosis; cardiac irregularities; muscle fasciculations; dyspnea. See NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards (DHHS/NIOSH 97-140, 1997) p 142.
Use: Nematocide, insecticide.
Fenthion Fentiazac Fenticlor Fenticonazole Fentonium Bromide

Fensulfothion
Fensulfothion.svg
Identifiers
CAS number 115-90-2
PubChem 8292
ChemSpider 7991
Jmol-3D images Image 1
Properties
Molecular formula C11H17O4PS2
Molar mass 308.35 g mol−1
Appearance Brown liquid or yellow oil[1]
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
Infobox references

Fensulfothion is an insecticide and nematicide.[2] It is highly toxic and listed as an extremely hazardous substance.[3] It is widely used on corn, onions, rutabagas, pineapple, bananas, sugar cane, sugar beets, pea nuts, etc.[4]