Trypsin

Title: Trypsin
CAS Registry Number: 9002-07-7
Trademarks: Parenzymol (Horner); Trypure (Novo)
Literature References: Mol wt 24,000. Proteolytic enzyme formed in the small intestine by the action of a peptidase, enterokinase, on the pancreatic cell product, trypsinogen. Acts on lysyl and arginyl bonds of peptide chains and hydrolyzes even esters and amides. Reviews: Desnuelle, "Trypsin" in The Enzymes vol. 4, P. D. Boyer et al., Eds. (Academic Press, New York, 2nd ed., 1960) pp 119-132; Keil, ibid. vol. 3 (3rd ed., 1971) pp 250-275; Inagami, "Trypsin" in Proteins, Structure and Function vol. 1, M. Funatsu et al., Eds. (Kodansha, Tokyo, Wiley, New York, 1972) pp 1-83.
Properties: Yellow to grayish-yellow powder or crystals. Stable indefinitely in dry form at room temp. Sol in water. Practically insol in alcohol or glycerol. Readily sol in Sorensen's sodium phosphate buffer soln. Acts optimally at pH values between 7 and 9. Solns lose 75% of their potency within 3 hrs at room temp. Prepn of stabilized trypsin compositions contg partially hydrolyzed gelatin: Sullivan, Martin, US 2930736 (1960 to National Drug).
Therap-Cat: Enzyme (proteolytic).
Therap-Cat-Vet: Enzyme (proteolytic).
Keywords: Enzyme; Proteolytic.
Tryptamine Tryptazan Tryptophan Tryptophol TSQ

Trypsin
Identifiers
EC number 3.4.21.4
CAS number 9002-07-7
Databases
IntEnz IntEnz view
BRENDA BRENDA entry
ExPASy NiceZyme view
KEGG KEGG entry
MetaCyc metabolic pathway
PRIAM profile
PDB structures RCSB PDB PDBe PDBsum
Gene Ontology AmiGO / EGO
Trypsin
1UTN.png
Crystal structure of bovine trypsin.[1]
Identifiers
Symbol Trypsin
Pfam PF00089
InterPro IPR001254
SMART SM00020
PROSITE PDOC00124
MEROPS S1
SCOP 1c2g
SUPERFAMILY 1c2g
CDD cd00190

Trypsin (EC 3.4.21.4) is a serine protease from the PA clan superfamily, found in the digestive system of many vertebrates, where it hydrolyses proteins.[2][3] Trypsin is produced in the pancreas as the inactive proenzyme trypsinogen. Trypsin cleaves peptide chains mainly at the carboxyl side of the amino acids lysine or arginine, except when either is followed by proline. It is used for numerous biotechnological processes. The process is commonly referred to as trypsin proteolysis or trypsinisation, and proteins that have been digested/treated with trypsin are said to have been trypsinized.